Photoset

lindahall:

Plate 9:  Individuals with normal vision or tritanopia will see the number 56. Individuals with protanopia, deuteranopia, or achromotopsia will see no numbers.

Plate 19: Individuals with normal vision or tritanopia will see the number 5. Individuals with protanopia or deuteranopia will see the number 2. Individuals with achromotopsia will see no numbers.

Plate 34. Individuals with normal vision, tritanopia, or achromotopsia will see no numbers. Individuals with protanopia or deuteranopia will see the number 73.

From Tests for Colorblindness, Shinobu Ishihara, 1940. These plates will not be an accurate test because of fading colors and variations with monitors.

So…What’s it called when you see all the numbers?

(via scientificillustration)

Photoset

phil-irish-artist:

By copyrighting his property as an artwork, he has prevented oil companies from drilling on it.

Peter Von Tiesenhausen has developed artworks all over his property in northern Alberta.  There’s a boat woven from sticks that is gradually being reclaimed by the land; there is a fence that he adds to each year of his life, and there are many “watching” trees, with eyes scored into their bark.

Oil interests pester him continually about drilling on his land.  His repeated rebuffing of their advances lead them to move toward arbitration.  They made it very clear that he only owned the top 6 inches of soil, and they had rights to anything underneath.  He then, off the top of his head, threatened them that he would sue damages if they disturbed his 6 inches, for the entire property is an artwork.  Any disturbance would compromise the work, and he would sue.

Immediately after that meeting, he called a lawyer (who is also an art collector) and asked if his intuitive threat would actually hold legally.  The lawyer visited, saw the scope of the work on the property, and wrote a document protecting the artwork.

The oil companies have kept their distance ever since.

This is but one example of Peter’s ability to negotiate quickly on his feet, and to find solutions that defy expectations.

(via spiritbreather)

Photoset

hifructosemag:

Hedi Xandt’s sculptures add macabre twists to classical imagery. See more on Hi-Fructose

(via slowartday)

Photoset

Amber and Abbey, have you seen these?

(Source: tomatozero23, via aameliaajo)

Photoset

princex-misdreavus:

For Every Flower Forced To Bloom, 2013 

digital film stills

i have never felt something as much as i am feeling this

(Source: ebony-eden, via envyisokay)

Photo
thoselonelyeyes:

fullmoon-unicorn:

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

thoselonelyeyes:

fullmoon-unicorn:

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

(Source: fullmoonwolves, via envyisokay)

Photo
feedmyaddictionnow:

kingofwesteros:

Publicity done right in an anti-rape campaign: double-page spread, pages glued to one another. After the reader forcefully separates them, the image above is revealed with the caption “if you have to use force, it’s rape”.

THIS IS BRILLIANT

feedmyaddictionnow:

kingofwesteros:

Publicity done right in an anti-rape campaign: double-page spread, pages glued to one another. After the reader forcefully separates them, the image above is revealed with the caption “if you have to use force, it’s rape”.

THIS IS BRILLIANT

(via weshouldwritepornography)

Photoset

pabloelian:

Beautiful photos of abandoned places.

(Source: amroyounes, via lowercasesncapitals)

Photoset

hifructosemag:

tierradentro:

The Real Life Models, by Flora Borsi.

1. “The Corn Poppy”, c.1919, Kees van Dongen;

2. “Woman with Green Hat”, 1939, Pablo Picasso;

3. “Portrait of a Polish Woman”, 1919, Amedeo Modigliani;

4. “Gelber Narrenhut”, 1955, Rudolf Hausner.

5. “Female Torso”, c.1933, Kazimir Malevich.

(Thanks to aanubis)

Makes sense now!

Photoset

(Source: kashimiru, via ex-pletives)

Photoset

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Wookjae Maeng  ( Korean ) - Ceramics and Slip Casting

The theme of my work is to represent complex, ambiguous and uncomfortable
relationships between man and animal. Nature and animals has been an object of art  for a long time. And, it will be continued until the fall of human being,although the point of view has been changed. There are lots of living creatures on the earth.

The human is on the top of the ecological pyramid now and can manage all kinds of our fellow creatures. However, it is getting worse for certain.

http://wookjae.com/
 


(via hifructosemag)

Photoset

supersonicart:

Kaye Donachie.

Paintings by Kaye Donachie:

Read More

(via supersonicart)

Photoset
Photoset

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Top   "Essential Friends" 40"Hx 30"W, 2013

Bottom Three 2014 Paintings



(via hifructosemag)

Photoset

montereybayaquarium:

An Ancient Fascination

Octopuses and their kin, sea creatures known collectively as cephalopods, have grabbed hold of our collective imagination for thousands of years.

We share this fascination as manifested in art, literature and contemporary culture in “Tentacles: The Astounding Lives of Octopuses, Squid and Cuttlefishes.” Highlights include:

  • A steampunk-style sculpture made from raised copper and brass with glass in the Japanese technique called “Tankin.”
  • Ancient Minoan pottery replicas painted with cephalopod designs.
  • An illustration from Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.
  • A drawing of octopuses attacking a fleet of ships, depicted as fact by a French naturalist in 1803.
  • A highly detailed drawing of cephalopods by famed naturalist Ernst Haeckel.
  • Glass models of squid and octopuses by father-son team of Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka.
  • A replica of the famous abstract work, The Birth of the Cephalopods, by Mark Rothko.
  • A dramatic depiction of a sea of ammonites 73 million years ago.
  • A replica of the intriguing yet slightly disturbing image of Contessa with Squid by Omar Rayyan.
  • Cephalopod tattoo art.

We also commissioned San Francisco Bay Area artist Nemo Gould to create three kinetic sculptures for “Tentacles” using found objects. Gould has transformed a jumble of junk into delightful dioramas that carry conservation messages delivered through a sense of wonderment.

Tentacles" opens April 12.

(via scientificillustration)